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horizontal view of artwork in exhibition space
Installation view of The Human Body © Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann
view of artwork in exhibition space with view of High Line
Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann
a bronze sculpture with a painting in the background
Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann

The Hill Art Foundation is pleased to announce a group exhibition of works from the Hill Collection curated by Karel Schampers. The exhibition, The Human Body, will be open September 9–November 24, 2021.

Schampers has selected works representative of the human form demonstrating the depth of the Hill collection which includes works from the last 500+ years. The Hill’s renaissance bronze collection is featured alongside works by artists such as Andy Warhol, Jenny Saville, and Peter Paul Rubens.

For the first time at the Foundation, the exhibition will draw entirely from the Hill Collection. Schampers was given unprecedented access to the Collection which focuses on in-depth collecting within four major categories: Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes, Old Master Paintings, Post-War Figurative Modern Masters, and Emerging Contemporary Artists. One of the Hill Collection’s defining features is how it creates dialogue among works of art across diverse periods and mediums.

The Hill Art Foundation is free and open to the public. Appointments are encouraged but are not necessary. Please note that we require all guests to wear a mask and sign in upon arrival, regardless of vaccination status. Email info@hillartfoundation.org to make an appointment. The Foundation will be open to the public Wednesday–Saturday from 12–6 p.m.

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Karel Schampers (1950) was curator of the print room of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (1981-1986); chief curator modern and contemporary art of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen Rotterdam (1986-2000); director of the Frans Hals Museum Haarlem (2000-2014). He has organized exhibitions of amongst others Matthew Barney, Günther Förg, Isa Genzken, Bob Gober, David Hockney, Jörg Immendorff, On Kawara, Martin Kippenberger, Ron Mueck, Cady Noland, Jorge Pardo, Stephen Prina, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Christopher Williams and Christopher Wool.

Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann
Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann
Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann Installation view of The Human Body © Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann Installation view of The Human Body ©Hill Art Foundation Photograph by Matthew Herrmann
Installation view of The Human Body. Photograph by Matthew Herrmann. © 2021 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Rubens 01 Detail 02
From Adam Williams and Alan Wintermute
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Man with a beard being dressed in armor by two young boys.
Peter Paul Rubens, Commander Being Dressed for Battle, 1610–14. Oil on panel, 48 1/4 x 38 3/8 inches (122.6 x 97.5 cm). 
©Hill Art Foundation, Photo: Matthew Herrmann.
A close-up painting of a white man with red hair and a red beard.
Anthony van Dyck, Study of a Bearded Man, 1618. 
Oil on panel, 11 5/8 x 8 7/8 inches (29.5 x 22.5 cm). 
©Hill Art Foundation. 

This resource from the J. Paul Getty Museum explains the lost-wax casting method. Most of the bronzes in The Human Body were made using this technique.

The J. Paul Getty Museum, "Adriaen de Vries’s bronze casting technique: direct lost-wax method," in Smarthistory, December 20, 2015. https://smarthistory.org/bronze-casting-lost-wax/.
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